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Information on the latest vitamin D news and research.

Find out more information on deficiency, supplementation, sun exposure, and how vitamin D relates to your health.

Vitamin D to be added to some cereals in Canada

Kellogg’s has received approval to start adding vitamin D to its cereals in Canada. The approval comes from the governmental body Health Canada.

Researchers have found that many Canadians aren’t getting the currently recommended 600 IUs per day from their diet. In Canada, if you want to try to get some vitamin D from your diet as opposed to sunlight and supplements, you have to look to fatty fish and fortified margarine. Now with Health Canada approval, Kellogg’s hopes to add cereal to the list.

A Kellogg’s spokeswoman said in an email that there will be a three-year consumption study, looking at Canadian sales and demographic data, “to determine if expanded discretionary Vitamin D fortification for other foods would benefit Canadians.” This information will help the government decide if they should make vitamin D fortification of cereals easier or even mandatory.

Susan Whiting, professor of nutrition at University of Saskatchewan, recommended cereals in Canada be fortified years ago. She said the increase in rickets incidence lately due to vitamin D deficiency are “the tip of the iceberg.” She says she hopes to see mandatory fortification of cereals in the near future.

Special K cereals fortified with vitamin D are now on store shelves, with labels advertising them as a source of vitamin D. This summer the company also got three-year permission to try fortifying Rice Krispies, Mini-Wheats, Krave, Froot Loops, Frosted Flakes and Corn Pops, too.

Source

Mills C. Kellogg given OK to add ‘Sunshine Vitamin’ to cereal. Toronto Star, 2013

2 Responses to Vitamin D to be added to some cereals in Canada

  1. Rita and Misty says:

    I wrote about this subject on another members’ blog just last week!

    I visited the supermarket for a vitamin D “experiment.” I wanted to see just what foods were fortified with vitamin D…even miniscule amounts of vitamin D…and either D2 or D3…

    What’s the saying? Inquiring minds want to know….

    Well, I was severely disappointed.

    Yes, milk is fortified with some D…and it appears more often with D2 than D3.

    Some eggs are fortified, but not many.

    However, I found no yogurt, ice cream, or cheese fortified with D.

    And, much to my outright HORROR…most BABY FOODS are lacking in vitamin D.

    Dr. Cannell, I–just like you–truly believe that the prevention of disease may start very early in life. And, yes this is why it is so important to get enough vitamin D throughout the lifespan.

    My concern is that this just isn’t going to happen for mainstream society, unless some sort of action is taken.

    Look, we here all know that the IOM references 20 ng/ml as being sufficient.

    We also know that so many people here in at least the US fall below 20 ng/ml.

    This is disgraceful. It is also unethical. And, it is costly to our overall health care system for those of us motivated by dollars, and I guess we all need to be to some extent.

    I truly believe food fortification is part of the solution, and that even very small amounts of D3 placed in various dairy products and baby food would help get the population at least up to 20 ng/ml. This is a start, and it is a “foot in the door” so to speak regarding the future and higher amounts of fortification.

  2. Rita and Misty says:

    We have to start somewhere. Let’s remember that fortifying foods with Thiamine eliminated Beriberi; fortifying foods with Iodine eliminated goiter; fortifying foods with vitamin C eliminated Scurvy. What more is there to say?