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Information on the latest vitamin D news and research.

Find out more information on deficiency, supplementation, sun exposure, and how vitamin D relates to your health.

Mendelian randomization: Genetically low vitamin D levels are related to increased mortality

A new study published in British Medical Journal used Mendelian randomization to discover that genetically low vitamin D levels were related to increased all-cause mortality, cancer mortality, and other mortality, but not cardiovascular mortality.

Mendelian randomization is a unique type of study design which examines how genes that are associated with certain health markers affect physical traits. We covered this design in a previous blog.

Vitamin D has been associated with increased all-cause, cardiovascular, and cancer mortality in observational research. However, the randomized intervention trials that have examined the relationship between vitamin D supplementation and mortality have not provided clear support for a role of vitamin D in mortality.

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  About: Will Hunter

Will is the Program Associate of the Vitamin D council and works on website administration, content production and editing, and fundraising. He is passionate about nutrition, exercise, and technology and how they relate to health and longevity.

One Response to Mendelian randomization: Genetically low vitamin D levels are related to increased mortality

  1. The study found that 1 or 2 genes associated with low vitamin D were not associated with heart problems.
    OK.
    3 other genes associated with low vitamin D have been studied in depth
    291 genes have been found to be affected by just 2,000 IU of vitamin D.
    2,000 genes have vitamin D receptors.

    So, all this study proved was that 0.1% of the genes related to low vitamin D are not associated with heart problems.