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Information on the latest vitamin D news and research.

Find out more information on deficiency, supplementation, sun exposure, and how vitamin D relates to your health.

High-dose vitamin D supplementation appears safe and effective as an adjunctive therapy in reducing high blood pressure

A randomized, double-blind, controlled trial showed that weekly supplementation with 50,000 IU of vitamin D added to antihypertensive medications improved systolic, diastolic, and mean arterial blood pressures in hypertensive patients who were deficient in vitamin D.

In patients with hypertension, or high blood pressure, there are two measurements that serve as important indicators: systolic and diastolic blood pressure. Systolic blood pressure (SBP) is the top number in a blood pressure reading. This is the highest measurement of the arterial pressure when the heart contracts, or beats.

Diastolic blood pressure (DBP) is the bottom number in a blood pressure reading. This is the lowest measurement of arterial pressure between heartbeats, when the heart is resting.

Mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) is the average of SBP and DBP. It is often elevated in hypertensive patients but is not commonly measured in clinical practice.

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  About: Will Hunter

Will is the Program Associate of the Vitamin D council and works on website administration, content production and editing, and fundraising. He is passionate about nutrition, exercise, and technology and how they relate to health and longevity.

2 Responses to High-dose vitamin D supplementation appears safe and effective as an adjunctive therapy in reducing high blood pressure

  1. Davidclements says:

    Dear Council,

    Thanks for this report. it is helpful for me as a Primary Care provider for those with Hypertension.

    I would like to request that you always specify in your headlines and reports of trials whether Vitamin D2 or D3 is being used. I was able to find easily from the Pubmed link that cholecalciferol, D3, was used in this trial. But it would be easier and preferable for the Council to have a policy of always specifying.

    Many articles on this site offer evidence that D2 and D3 do not have equivalent effects. Many physicians still think these are interchangeable (and that D2 may be “special” or “better” because it is the most readily available prescription supplement).

    Thanks

    David Clements, MD

  2. tyler craig dc says:

    Has there been any established effect on BP from high-dose vit D supplementation alone?